Thursday, October 17, 2013

SMART Goals by Assistant Principals 13-14

63 comments:

  1. Lindsay HennarichsOctober 17, 2013 at 8:30 PM

    Leadership Project SMART Goal:
    By spring 2014, Literacy Benchmark Scores will increase by 5% for a proficiency of 85% for 3rd-5th grade students.

    By spring 2014, NWEA MAP scores for K-5 students will increase by 25% in the area of vocabulary with the implementation of a school-wide initiative in vocabulary instruction.

    Below is the data from our fall MAP testing and 2013 Benchmark Exam:
    o More than 50% of K-2 students are below grade level in the area of Foundations of Reading, Vocabulary, Word study
    o 60% of 3rd and 4th are below grade level in the area of Foundations of Reading, Vocabulary, Word study
    o 67% of 5th below grade level in the area of Foundations of Reading, Vocabulary, Word study

    2013 Benchmark Literacy scores for all students were 78.67%
    2013 Benchmark Literacy scores for TAGG students were 75.95%

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    1. Are your MAP assessments based on the CCSS? Our school has shifted the inspection of our data to MAPS since both our reading and math MAP testing is based off of CCSS.
      I wonder if this is a trend across the region?

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    2. Jason,
      While I think I agree with this shift, it makes using MAP as a valid measure of progress more difficult. I'll be interested to see how it serves as a predictor of success on the actual PARCC.

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    3. MAP data gained off of the Arkansas Standards would seem irrelevant to me?

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  2. Smart Goal #1 Literacy By May 2014, 60% of all students will meet their growth goal in literacy according to Measures of Academic Progress.
    Smart Goal #1 Math By May 2014, 70 % of all students will meet their growth goal in math, according to Measures of Academic Progress.
    Smart Goal #2 Literacy By May 2014, 50% of all students will be on grade level in literacy according to Measures of Academic Progress.
    Smart Goal #2 Math By May 2014, 55% of all students will be on grade level in math according to Measures of Academic Progress.

    A strategic action plan has be created to evaluated the initiatives in my school each quarter. Data will be collected each quarter and adjustments will be made as necessary to be sure our school initiatives are effective for increased student achievement.

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    1. I love MAPS! As an educator and a parent! The feedback of data is so much quicker. Since it is performance based I believe it gives a much better idea of where each student truly compares to the NORM.

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    2. Can you explain what Measures of Academic Progress is? I am interested in how you are determining your growth.

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    3. MAP Is a computerized testing system that is given three times a year to students. Are K-2 students test covers CCSS and our 3-5 test covers the AR standards. The program sets goals for expected student growth and gives detailed data for teachers to see where students are struggling. We use the AR state standards because there is a correlation between MAP and benchmark. It's hard because we have been teaching CCSS and adding those benchmark standards in. Next year we will do CCSS tests with K-5.

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    4. Angela, In Bentonville we are giving the MAPS all the way to 6th grade. Our district has been very proactive and only gives the MAPS assessment based off of the CCSS. While the Benchmark test is in its last year, we have support from our BOE to go ahead and assess all we can using the CCSS. MAPS allows teacher much quicker feedback to adjust their instruction. In fact, you can get your class reports the NEXT day! MAPS also allows the students to see what we call a RIT score. This allows teachers to collaborate with kids and set goals for their next assessment! Great way to give students ownership of their own progress! I have seen some of our more at risk kiddos look at these score and WANT to do better! I am a HUGE MAPS fan!!

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    5. I like the potential for MAP to show growth but there is frustration with the inaccuracy of the winter results. NWEA only considers the Fall-Spring to be a valid measure of growth but without the mid-year measure, we are no better off than we were with the Benchmark or ITBS. I think STAR has come a long way in its validity as a true measure of growth and it also provides immediately relevant teaching tools to meet students where they are.

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    6. MAP feedback is a lot faster until waiting until June to get the results. As a building with only 2 grades, BM results come in after half of our student body is gone to the next level. STAR and MAP feedback is so quick it can assist guiding instruction NOW. I am sorry Rachel, but I do not know what frustrations you are experiencing with the winter results? Would love to hear about it. I could be missing something!

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  3. SMART Goal - By May 2014, there will be 2 surveys sent to the parents of Old High Middle School special education students to determine parental satisfaction in their participation in their childs special education meetings. The first survey (Nov. 2012) will gather and identify baseline data. The second survey (April 2014)will show an increase in the satisfaction of parents by 10%.

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    Replies
    1. This is a great idea! We survey our parents during annual reviews in the spring with the ADE survey......wonder if that would meet your needs so you don't have to "recreate the wheel"! I'm looking forward to hearing about your results!

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    2. Excellent! We also have the ADE survey completed by parents during the annual review conferences. We have new staff on board at our school and changes have been occurring. I would be interested in the results of a survey sent out to our current parents.

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    3. We do the ADE survey as well. However, as the SPED designee in my building i spoke with our SPED PLC and we are trying to get down to a more intimate understanding of how our departments relationship is with our parents. I guess in a non professional term we are looking to see "just how we are doing at OHMS." The coolest thing about it, is my SPED team loved the idea! I just had to dangle the carrott and they ran with it!

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    4. We have talked about doing this as well. Right now, we are mostly concerned with collaboration within the building between sped and gen ed. I developed an "RTI for SPED" form that allows us to re-examine students whose placements are not working as the should be. In the past, this has resulted in just changing the placement, not drilling down to see if the programming they are currently receiving are being utilized with fidelity." It's been more of a "let's try this and see what happens" and then just try something else if it doesn't work without a true basis for the change. We are going to try to address the root of the problem (the inner workings of the department itself) and then survey to see if the results are there.

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    5. I will be excited to see your results of the survey and would love to talk to you more once the data returns. We are starting our third year, and I am on my third resource teacher, the other two moved due to their husband's job being relocated to a different state, and would really like to implement something very similar next year. We will be redoing our RTI packet this summer and this is something we could also add to that process.

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  4. By May 2014, our "All student" sub-pop for 3rd, 4th and 5th grade combined will meet or exceed the targeted AMO of 82.39% in Literacy according to the Benchmark.

    By May 2014, 70% of our K-5 students will meet or exceed their individual targeted growth expectation as measured by the Spring 2014 MAP Reading results

    By May 2014, our RTI process will become more systematic across the building as measured by teacher surveys, SCALE process and a 1-3% increase on Benchmark proficiency for 3rd, 4th and 5th grade literacy and math.

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    1. I am also interested in the SCALE process.

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    2. We have also worked to make our RTI more effective/systematic. Would love to hear what you did.

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    3. I also want to know how you guys are making RTI more systematic. Please share!

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  5. Stephanie,
    We are revamping some of our district RTI practices, and I am curious as to what the SCALE process is. Looking forward to seeing you again :-)

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  6. By January 2014, there will be a 25% decrease in discipline issues on buses as measured by the number of bus referrals submitted.

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    Replies
    1. Angela, I can't wait to hear some of your strategies to getting to this goal! We struggle with bus discipline as well!

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    2. I am with Jason on this one...bus discipline is a big issue for us as well. Looking forward to hearing some good ideas.

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    3. What is most frustrating to me about bus discipline is we have to deal with it at all! Our district used to have the transportation department address the issues. However, our current transportation director beleives building administration should deal with it now because he says we have the proper "certification". I wouldn't know 95% of the bus drivers if they came up and slapped me in the face. However, I am supposed to tell them how to run their buses?

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  7. By April, 2014 there will be an increase of 15% in the number of students scoring proficient on the ITBS.

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  8. SMART Goal - By May 2014, there will be 2 surveys sent to the teachers of Cooper Elementary School to determine both general and special education satisfaction with collaboration and resulting student achievement of students receiving special education services. The first survey (October 2013) will gather initial information related to current collaboration and training. The second survey (April 2014)will show an increase in collaboration and teacher satisfaction by 10% with resulting increase in student achievement on the Benchmark by 5%. Ongoing progress will be monitored by MAP assessments.

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  9. SMART GOAL PART 1: By December 20, 2013 100% of Tillery RTI students who are 2 year's behind will have completed intervention documentation as measured/evidenced by MAP assessment, Dibels, DRA, Benchmark data, and teacher assessments.

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  10. SMART Goal: By May 2014 I will collaborate with the science PLCs to design effective lessons through Understanding by Design and create common assessments to be used department wide.
    Two (2) UbD Units completed
    Two (2) common assessments per quarter
    Have evidence of PLCs using students results from at least 4 common assessments

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  11. By May 2014, there will be a 25% decrease in the number of detention assignments based upon first quarter numbers.

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    1. Looking forward to hearing some of your strategies on this...

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  12. By May 2014, all students presented in a Kid Talk (student with an AIP and students that teachers are very concerned about) will have shown growth with at least 80% of those students discussed being dismissed from the AIP based on DIBELS, growth in ind reading level, skills assessments, and ITBS and Benchmark scores.

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  13. By May 2014, there will be a 20% increase in the STAR Reading scaled scores of our students with disabilities being served with a literacy IEP in special education.

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  14. By December 2014, I will have completed at least 35 focus walks and co-taught in 5 classrooms to assist in implementing cooperative learning groups and effective questioning and classroom management as evidenced by completed focus walks, teacher reflections and responses and conference notes.

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  15. By May 2014, I will collaborate with the sixth grade academy staff to establish the foundation for the academy as evidenced by the documentation of the team work.

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  16. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRTKwxKwUsg

    This link is to Doug Reeves - The Changing Role of the Principal Today

    This is for the December 4th Blackboard Session (Yeah! I am on top of it)

    The main points I thought about in his his presentation are:

    1. Leadership assessment is just as important as teacher assessment.
    2. Building administration and Central Office all need to be held accountable.
    3. Discussion of the "Nutron Bomb Effect". This is where is the district just comes in and fires the building leadership without giving them the opportunity to grow. This approach can have drastic effect on student achievment.
    4. It is easy to fire administrators. It is always been culturally acceptable that it is to hard to get building leaders to improve. States are chanching their views on this. (Perfect example - Arkansas and the LEADS process we are going through).
    5. Principals must find specific leadership stratgies that work for their building. Doug Reeves discusses how "One size does not fit all."

    This was a very interesting presentation. I got to hear Doug Reeves speak when I was at the Solution Tree PLC Institute. While his delievery is a bit dry, he has very good insight.

    More to come....

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    Replies
    1. like it. Accountability has to be from the top down and not from the bottom up!

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  17. Part II of Doug Reeves - The Changing Role of the Principal Today

    6. When we face more than six initiatives we get frustrated (seems very common in my opinion)
    I read Mike Schmoker's bool FOCUS. It discusses the "Less is More" approach in education.
    7. Faculty Meeting should be called Professional Working Meetings (manage later!) I love this idea. It is getting a bit easier, but there is still so much to "manage".
    8. Constant feedback to colleages is so important. Not just EVALUATIONS, but feedback. This makes me think of the "No More Valentines" article from Morgan L. Donaldson in the Educational Leadership journal from May 2010.

    More to come

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  18. 9. Goal setting and feedback are the key for leadership to improve student learning.
    10. Shared leadership! A team which supports the goals of the building. Meetings should be about teaching and learning, not management. (In my opinion, harder said than done with everything that is being asked out of all of the stakeholders)
    11. "We say we value collaboration, but what do we call kids that collaborate on state test?" Doug Reeves (Good point!)

    More to come (long video!)

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    1. Love number 11! Think I will watch this

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    2. As I stated earlier, the gentleman does not have the best delivery, but the nuts and bolts of the message is very strong!

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  19. I am currently reading some great books, but when it comes to articles and blogs the best one I have found so far is the "Changing Role of the Assistant Principal" http://www.principals.org/Context.aspx?topic=55757
    The key to the article I highlighted was the quote "APs must refuse to wallow in the discouraging aspects of the job and instead generate a positive energy that is so contagious that tother are inspired to excel." This is my new mantra to read everyday. The article ends with some bulleted ideas for assistant principals which are important to our continued learning.

    The two books I am currently reading or rereading are Mindset by Carol Dweck and Engaging Students with Poverty in Mind by Jensen. I read Mindset several years ago, but I don't think I was ready yet to fully internalize the meaning and how it impacts students. The engagement book is for my leadership group. We have been studying the work of Jensen and using his suggestions to help with the discipline with our kiddos. It is a slow process, but I feel like it is going to pay off.

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    1. I agree with Mindset. I think I need to go back and read that book again.

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    2. As I have grown into my position I have found it very beneficial to go back and read things again! In the past I have read a professional article once, set it down, and never come back to it. I have found myself going back to things as I have grown in my career and learning that reading the piece for a second time can shed new light on the topic.

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  20. I'm posting a short, but thoughtful article. Check it out...Assistant Principals
    in Indiana as Change Leaders: The Need for Professional Development...

    http://www.oak.edu/~oakedu/assets/ck/files/JLAS_SP10_Abebe_Lindsey_Bonner_Heck_7.pdf

    This is exactly what we are learning. So often we are the ones conducting PD, however as change agents pursuing PD for ouselves is just as important, if not, more important.

    One more thing...I am finishing up "Learning From Lincoln" and it is definitely on my recommended books to read list. It's definitely an encouraging book and it is a great reminder to all of us that we need to continuely pursue integrity at all times, no matter how difficult the circumstance is.

    Enjoy!
    Stephanie

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    1. I have been in that position where I was expected to do only certain jobs as the assistant principal. I have even been told that what I was doing was a principals job and not an assistant principals job. The job I have now not only allows me to branch out away from the managerial task but expects me to do so and I can say that as an assistant principal I welcome the new opportunities.

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  21. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/leadership_360/2013/03/principal's_role_changing_says_metlife_survey.html

    This article highlights the many roles that a principals play in order to successfully build the relationships needed to navigate a school to a superior status. The report states that most principals feel the job is too complex and has changed drastically over the last past years, including the right to control the heart of the school. The heart of the school consists of curriculum, instructions and dismissing staff that are not adequate.
    As a principal, we are chasing a moving target. Today it may be in sight and tomorrow it may have disappeared depending on politics, laws, stakeholders, students and/or central office.

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    1. My opinion only: It takes a different type of person today to go into school leadership than it did 20 years ago. Simply because of the many different things administration is asked to do now. I always say that a 10 pound weight is not really that much. However, when you keep adding 10 pounds here and 10 pounds there, it adds up rather quickly!

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    2. I agree that the role of the principal is ever changing but I hope that building relationships with all the different stakeholders will always be a central role.

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  22. I am sharing about Marzano’s research on change. I first read chapter 5 titled Two Types of Change in the book School Leadership that Works: From Research to Results. I really wanted to share this because as administrators and our changing role as an instructional leader or learning Leader we face both of these types of change on a regular basis. I did an online search and found the YouTube video titled Marzano Research Laboratory: Dr. Marzano on 2nd Order Change. www.youtube.com/watch?v=iv7crrER_S4
    In summary- First order changes are the small changes (examples: what we are going to do to be an achieving school this year, change in schedule, a new program brought in) where the leader gets staff input, supports the staff along the way, builds culture and a common language. While these changes are occurring, the administrative team is using Marzano’s 21 Responsibilities and Day to Day Management of a School.
    Second order changes are the larger changes (examples: PARCC, TESS, CCSS) where the leaders are hearing people say “why should we have to do it differently, for years this worked, we don’t get any input….” But as leaders, we know we have to help make this type of change happen because it is in the best interest of student achievement. When second order change is occurring, only 7 of the 21 responsibilities are emphasized. Some perceptions that occur in the building are team spirit, cooperation, and common language is deteriorating. Communication, order and routine and level of input are also deteriorating.
    One thing I can take away from this concept is as we are in a time of lots of second order changes; we have to change our leadership to help keep positive perceptions in the building. We must help our positive staff members stay positive and grow them as teacher leaders during a time of change.

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    1. I completely agree that it is our job to help others to stay positive about 2nd order changes, they aren't really changes we have control over. When I think about the changes we have made with CCSS, it has really helped us to up our rigor in our instruction, along the same lines TESS has really been a useful (although time consuming) tool to guide teachers to use best practices and help them to become reflective! :)

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    2. It is those 2nd order changes that are sometimes difficult to defend unless you have great support from the top down. This is when you love those speed boats that will help clear the way for the cruise ship.

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  23. http://www.iel.org/programs/21st/reports/principal.pdf

    This article is Leadership for Student Learning: Reinventing the Principalship and was written in October of 2000.

    I chose it because I wanted to see if it was aligned with what expectations and responsibilities of a principal in 2013 and I believe it is. The article talks about principals not being just managers of a building and staff but about being an instructional leader which is aligned with the role of a principal today. The article discusses in length that in order to be an effective instructional leader there needs to be disturbed leadership and that there is no single method that is sure to work for every school. In addition it talks about why this job is so difficult: too little pay, 80 hour work week, overbearing district leadership, demanding parents, uneven quality teachers, low status and poor image, stressful responsibilities (raising student achievement, all problems of society, keeping buses on time, etc.) and insufficient resources for rising expectations. These are all issues I believe a principal still struggles with even 13 years after this article was written.

    With all that being said, here is the good news........although this position is tough and thankless, this study and I believe current studies show that the importance of a school principal is vital! They influence school performance by shaping school goals, guiding school policy and procedures and CONTRIBUTE DIRECTLY TO STUDENT LEARNING!!! "Researchers, policy makers, and educational practitioners agree: good school principals are the keystone of good schools."

    Therefore my fellow Assistant Principals.....I want to encourage you to press on and support your principals, teachers, students and everyone else who help keep our schools running! You have been placed in your current position to lead change (even if it is only taking care of discipline), and change lives! Our job is just as hard but important today as it was 13 years ago and will continue to be in the future!

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  24. http://work.chron.com/changing-roles-principals-10908.html
    This site includes different articles based on educational topics (financial responsibilities of principals, average salaries, characteristics of successful principals, and more). The article I read stresses that as schools trim their budgets, principals have the task of doing more with less money. Accountability for students to perform better on standardized tests is still a priority.
    Principals are facing a changing leadership structure in which there is shared power with classroom teachers. Instructional leader responsibilities have increased in all areas and are extremely different in the area of technology. Principals are looking for improved delivery systems and are challenged to stay current with technological advances available. The principal secures the funding required to make technology purchases and then must see to it that teachers understand how to use the new technology and incorporate it into lessons.
    http://www.principals.org/Content.aspx?topic=55757
    After reading about the changing role of the principal, I wanted to read something that pertained more specifically to my role as assistant principal. I loved the article Changing Role of Assistant Principal. It describes the frustrations of meeting the daily routines and responsibilities that are “all consuming” and learning how to be as well as serve as an instructional leader. It provides a list of actions worthwhile for APs. I agree with Lindsey that a good mantra is "APs must refuse to wallow in the discouraging aspects of the job and instead generate a positive energy that is so contagious that others are inspired to excel."

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  25. http://teaching.about.com/od/admin/tp/Role-Of-The-Principal.htm
    This is short and to the point but touches on hiring new teachers.

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  26. http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/PB09_Leadership08.pdf

    This article was originally part of an NEA policy brief from 2008. Even though it is a few years old it’s very relevant for the changes still taking place in school leadership. Some of the issues addressed include the difficulty in finding time to adequately address instructional leadership as well as managing schools. It also addresses effective leadership as it impacts teacher performance and retention.

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    1. I read the same article. I came away with the problem being that Administrators are not trained or prepared to be an Educational Leader. How we solve the issue is going to take more than a couple of weeks.

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  27. http://cursa.ihmc.us/rid=1206976613786_1901503955_1669/DuFour-%20Learning%20Centered%20Principal.pdf

    This article by Du Four talks about his experience as a school leader and making sure that we are asking the right questions. He states that the right questions revolve around learning and not teaching, and that this is a tremendous shift for teachers. Rather than thinking of ourselves as instructional leaders, we need to think of ourselves as lead learners.

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    1. I was fortunate enought to be able to help host the DuFour's and Bob Eaker when they came to Bentonville a few years ago to present their PLC institute to our district. I got to sit and eat luch with them. All I can say....they live this stuff! While I know there is a large financial incentive for Solution Tree which they co-own, they believe strongly in what they preach!

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  28. http://alaprincipalpractices.blogspot.com

    "The Principal's Role in Successful Schools: Creating a Positive School Culture"
    Principal; September/October 2008

    This article talked about two specific activities that school leaders can implement that help improve and/or build a positive school climate.
    ~Creating a Sense of Belonging
    * for students
    * for teachers
    * for parents and community

    ~ Provide Clear Direction
    *for students
    * for teachers
    * for parents and community
    The author studied the actions and behaviors of principals in 3 high performing schools that all had the struggles that come along with a low socioeconomic student population. All 3 principals were wearing many different hats as administrators, but she found that the constant variable that was different in these schools was the focused attention on creating a positive school culture. All of the other hats were important and vital to the school success, but a positive school culture was imperative and in turn "enables the other areas to also achieve noteworthy outcomes."

    Good read!

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